mysteries

Establishing Character

on February 28, 2013

Story is Character.┬áThat’s the famous quote from Robert McKee. Story is character. Character is story. Meaning, without character, you have no story. Your character drives the story, your character makes the reader invested in the story. Without a character the reader can relate to, at least on some level, or sympathize with, or care about, the reader will be dissatisfied. Yes, you can certainly write a fabulous bestseller without characters you care about (I can think of at least one thriller I read this year where I hated the characters and hated the ending, yet couldn’t put the book down),… Read More


I tried to get my daughter to blog for me tonight …

on May 12, 2011

But she just rolled her eyes and said she needed her own blog. True, and that’s on the to do list for summer. I even had a topic for her. It started like this. We were sitting in the school parking lot yesterday after Kelly’s track practice (today is the big, final meet–wish her luck!) waiting for Starbucks. (No, Starbucks doesn’t deliver, but my oldest daughter does–especially when I’m paying.) I told her how inadequate I felt reading Murderati because we have a new blogger (David Corbett) who is just such a good writer–one of the all the words fit… Read More


Genre Blending

on October 16, 2008

A couple years ago, NYT bestseller James Rollins spoke to my local RWA chapter on blending genres. His presentation was fantastic–not only is Jim a great writer, but he’s also a fun and informed speaker. He suggested that one way to break out, or to write that something “fresh and different” that editors say they want is to take an element from another genre and blend it with the “rules” of an established genre. JD Robb’s books are a perfect example of a blended genre–romantic suspense novels set in the future. They’re truly three genres–mysteries, romance, and light science fiction…. Read More